Archive for the 'textiles' Category

LINDEN SWEATSHIRT : MANNING LIBERTY

Linden Sweatshirt in Manning

Grainline Studio : Linden Sweatshirt
Liberty of London : Manning Linford Fleece

This is my third Linden. Linden #1 is here.

One of the things that I love about the Linden is that it comes together quite quickly. When I feel like I want to sew something but don’t have a lot of time, the Linden does the trick. I get the satisfaction of sewing something from start to finish and I also get to add another sweatshirt to my collection. Win. Win.

Now that I know the fit is perfect, as I’m sewing the Linden together I like to twin needle stitch each seam. It takes a little extra time, but I love the way this detail looks.

Don’t forget! If you’re making self ribbing from the Liberty Fleece, you want to cut it on the bias.

Has anyone made any modifications to this pattern? I think I’m ready to experiment…

Linden Sweatshirt in Manning

Linden Sweatshirt in Manning

Linden Sweatshirt in Manning

Linden Sweatshirt in Manning

Linden Sweatshirt in Manning

Linden Sweatshirt in Manning

GRAINLINE STUDIO ALDER : NANI IRO

Grainline Studio Alder : nani IRO

Grainline Studio : Alder Shirtdress
nani IRO Double Gauze : Green Pierre Pocho

I haven’t done a lot of sewing this year.  My mind seems to be elsewhere these days, but I’m hoping that’s going to change soon. I think I just need to get some ducks in a row before I get back my sewing mojo. I can at least say that I’ve finally made an Alder shirtdress.

I made this just before my trip to London with Lizzy & Katherine. Officially, it was finished in London. Those buttons got sewn on in our Islington Flat. The trip was so quick, that I didn’t have time for a London photoshoot, so here we are again in my usual spot! (back stairs of the workroom)

I didn’t make any changes to this pattern and it fits really well. I love clothing with double gauze, especially in nani IRO.  I will say that making technical garments with double gauze is a bit of a challenge. It’s tricky to do things like tiny hems and collar stands to the level that I expect of myself, but nonetheless everything turned out pretty great. I will never stop making clothes with double gauze. It’s just important to remember the qualities and limitations of the material you’re working with. I am definitely planning to make my next version out of Liberty of London. I’m looking forward to re-sewing this pattern with that crisp tana lawn. Two modifications that I’ll be making with my next Alder will be adding some short sleeves (from the Grainline Archer Shirt) and adding a bit of length to the overall hem.  I found this version to be a bit short on the side seams to wear on it’s own. Probably 2-3 inches should do it.

I’ve had such great luck with Grainline Studio patterns. Now that the Tiny Pocket Tank is in print, it’s next on my hit list.

Grainline Studio Alder : nani IRO

Grainline Studio Alder : nani IRO

Grainline Studio Alder : nani IRO

Grainline Studio Alder : nani IRO

LINDEN SWEATSHIRT : DULWICH PARK LIBERTY

Linden Sweatshirt

Grainline Studio Linden Sweatshirt
Liberty of London Linford Fleece : Dulwich Park

I gotta say that I’ve fallen hard for this pattern. It’s a REALLY good one. Of course the fact that it’s winter just makes me fall harder for this cozy top.

I’ve been stashing a few pieces of Liberty fleece with the intention of making sweatshirts. This one was my ‘test version’ and thank goodness it went well!

The pattern has just eight pieces for version A. I didn’t have any ribbing on hand so decided to just use the fleece. I noticed that the fleece wasn’t really stretchy so I cut the neck band and cuff bands on the bias. I really like how the self fabric looks. It’s a great option since nice ribbing is so hard to find.

I used my serger to put the Linden together. It’s amazing how quickly things come together with a serger.  More and more I really love working with knits and my serger. Of course, you can totally make this project very easily with just your sewing machine. I used my twin needle to top stitch around the finished neck band and the bottom hem.

Immediately after I made this, I made another one in Liberty of London Manning. Right after, that I made one in some grey french terry I found in my stash.  I probably won’t stop making them because I don’t want to stop wearing them. Luckily there happens to be a big shipment of Liberty coming really soon with some pretty fleece for more Lindens.

Do you want to make a Linden with me? I’m doing a Linden class at the workroom!

Linden Sweatshirt

Linden Sweatshirt

Linden Sweatshirt

Linden Sweatshirt

Linden Sweatshirt

STYLISH DRESS BOOK ‘B’ : NANI IRO

Stylish Dress Book 'B' : nani IRO

Stylish Dress Book : Tunic ‘B’
nani IRO Neon Mountain View Double Gauze Cotton

I just realized it’s been a really long time since we’ve had nani IRO at the workroom. I’ll try not to let that happen again. This fabric just makes people happy.

It seems to be a tradition of mine to make this particular pattern from nani IRO. The very first version I made was exactly SIX years ago!

I love this simple top, it’s so easy to wear and incredibly comfortable. My favourite detail is definitely the sleeves. I love a puffy sleeve! I really like how this sleeve is two parts. If you’re making this pattern from the untranslated version of Stylish Dress Book, this can be the one tricky part. When you’re tracing out the pattern piece for the lower sleeve, you need to add in 10 cm to the width of the piece to add the fullness.

This collection has so many fun pops of neon, perfect for the coming winter months when things get very grey. I always find myself choosing brighter prints when the days get shorter. There is more nani IRO on the way for the new year, it’ll be a good mid winter pick me up!

I also made a pair of nani IRO pants using the 101 Trouser pant pattern. It’s already too cold to wear them, but I’ll try to get in some photos of them soon.

p.s. I ironed this top twice before taking these photos, but double gauze is wrinkly & comfy like that.

Stylish Dress Book 'B' : nani IRO

Stylish Dress Book 'B' : nani IRO

Stylish Dress Book 'B' : nani IRO

Stylish Dress Book 'B' : nani IRO

MCCALLS 6696 : CHAMBRAY UNION

McCall's 6696 : Chambray Union

McCalls 6696
Robert Kaufman : Chambray Union

I’m a sucker for a full skirt (especially with pockets!). Add that to a shirt dress and throw in some chambray and I’m in heaven. The Robert Kaufman Chambray Union collection has seriously infiltrated my wardrobe this year. I can’t help but want to make all the things with it. I keep re-ordering it for the shop and it keeps selling out. It’s just perfect for everything.

I’m pretty sure it was Johanna who pointed out this particular McCalls pattern to me last year and then ended up getting a hold of a copy for me. Thank you J!

There are so many great details on this dress. I really like the waistband and the gathered back detail. For the buttons, I decided to do covered buttons with the same fabric. Covered buttons are so easy to do and give such a polished look. I used Liberty Stanley for the little bits of bias binding on the arms and the pocket fabric. It makes me smile to see those bits.

The pattern was great to sew and fit me without any adjusting. I chose to do the sleeveless version, but there is a short sleeve option that I’m going to try next. I’m pretty sure I need a Liberty version of this pattern!

McCall's 6696 : Chambray Union

McCall's 6696 : Chambray Union

McCall's 6696 : Chambray Union

McCall's 6696 : Chambray Union

McCall's 6696 : Chambray Union

VICTORY PATTERNS HAZEL : LIBERTY UMBRIA

Victory Patterns Hazel : Liberty Umbria

Victory Patterns : Hazel Dress
Liberty of London : Umbria

I love a clever sewing pattern. The Hazel dress is one of those. I just love the way this pattern sews up, how the lining is added to make everything clean finished on the insides, that there is no zipper and the adorable bow! The pattern shows doing contrast fabrics for the top and the skirt, but I’m boring and love just using one fabric. Plus, I really love this particular Liberty Print, so I was happy to only showcase Umbria. To sum it up, this pattern is pretty awesome. So much so, that I used it to create a sleeveless shift version dress. I’ll post that one soon.

I’m pretty sure I’ll be making another Hazel with at least one of the new Fall 2014 Liberty prints that should be arriving this week!

Victory Patterns Hazel : Liberty Umbria

Victory Patterns Hazel : Liberty Umbria

Victory Patterns Hazel : Liberty Umbria

Victory Patterns Hazel : Liberty Umbria

Victory Patterns Hazel : Liberty Umbria

WIKSTEN TOVA : TOM FORD SHIRTING

Wiksten Tova : Tom Ford Shirting

Wiksten Tova
Tom Ford shirting from Sultan’s Fine Fabrics

Me Made May just finished and I had a lot of fun re-visiting my handmade wardrobe with fresh eyes. I’ll be posting many items over the next few weeks that I was able to finally photograph in detail to show you a closer look.

This Wiksten Tova dress was made from a luxurious Tom Ford shirting fabric that I bought at Sultan’s. As soon as I spotted the roll, I knew I needed to make a dress from it. I especially love making a Wiksten Tova using any type of plaid or check because one of my favourite things to do is cut the yoke on the bias. I was also very careful when cutting out the pieces to match the pattern from the front to the back piece, especially since the pattern is so bold.

I’m not sure if there’s a limit to how many Tovas a girl can have, but I think I could still use a few more.

Wiksten Tova : Tom Ford Shirting

Wiksten Tova : Tom Ford Shirting

VICTORY PATTERNS ROXANNE : LIBERTY GROWING FONDER

Victory Patterns Roxanne : Liberty of London Growing Fonder

Victory Patterns : Roxanne Top
Liberty of London : Growing Fonder Tana Lawn Cotton

We’re halfway through May and if you follow me on Instagram, you’ll know that I have been doing the Me Made May challenge for this month. Me Made May is an opportunity for people who knit or stitch handmade clothing to celebrate their wardrobe. I am NOT sewing a new garment everyday! I’m using this opportunity to celebrate my years of building my handmade wardrobe. I’m also taking the opportunity to document newer garments that I’ve never really shared and to re-document some old favourites. I’m loving looking into my closet each morning with fresh eyes and picking an outfit to share with you.

This is my second Roxanne top. I just loved the other version and wanted to try the second option with sleeves and the tie. I decided to use the beautiful Liberty of London Growing Fonder Print. I love the detail of this pattern and the fine lines. If you look closely you will also see there are metallic accents here and there. It’s just gorgeous. I decided to do some extreme pattern matching for this tunic. When I was sewing this, I was also watching the Great British Sewing Bee and imagined Patrick Grant judging my work. He’s a tough cookie, but he would appreciate these fine details. This really inspired me to push myself! I was very careful to centre the pattern on the front , the back and also each of the sleeves. I cut each sleeve separately and made sure the pattern was identical on each one. I also made sure that the pattern lined up as you go around the top from front to sleeve to back. To be extra extreme, on the back, I carefully calculated so that the pattern matched up in the centre from the back yoke to the back bodice, ACROSS THE SEAM! No one will ever know, but even the facing on the front neckline perfectly matched the piece it was sewn to. This took a fair bit of time, but I really enjoyed the challenge.

The one little snag I ran into was just a result of me not fully reading the pattern. When you sew in the sleeves for this, you use a smaller seam allowance of 3/8″ rather than the 5/8″ that you use for the rest of the pattern. When I figured this out, it really made a difference on how the sleeves fit!

I love the drama of this pattern! When you wear it, the way the back flows out and the way the back hem curves down just feels so fancy and fun!

I’m collecting all my Me Made May photos here and I’ll be posting lots of new garments for the rest of the month!

Victory Patterns Roxanne : Liberty of London Growing Fonder

Victory Patterns Roxanne : Liberty of London Growing Fonder

Victory Patterns Roxanne : Liberty of London Growing Fonder

Victory Patterns Roxanne : Liberty of London Growing Fonder

Victory Patterns Roxanne : Liberty of London Growing Fonder

ROXANNE : SUSANNA

Roxanne : Susanna Liberty

Victory Patterns : Roxanne
Liberty of London Tana Lawn Cotton in Susanna

I have had the pleasure of watching Victory Patterns emerge from dream to reality in the last couple years. When Kristiann Boos, one of the workroom’s instructors, told me she wanted to start a pattern company I was absolutely thrilled! Kristiann’s sense of design and style is so unique, I knew right away that she would produce patterns that were unlike others out on the market. She started out with PDF patterns and finally this year launched printed patterns. Kristiann’s patterns are lovely to work from. They are clearly written & illustrated, plus beautifully packaged.

The Roxanne pattern is a beginner level pattern. I chose to make the sleeveless version, mostly for the amazing collar detail. I went with the dark navy Susanna print from Liberty. The pattern was very simple, with the most complex part being that collar. The design of the collar is very clever and I got huge amounts of satisfaction sewing it. Once you’ve completed the collar, the rest of the top flies together. The top has a lot of volume, there are pleats that fall from the yoke at the back. With the right fabric, such as the Liberty Tana Lawn this volume creates a gorgeous silhouette and movement with the high/low hemline. I love that this top feel very elegant and dressy. I can’t wait to try a version with sleeves next.

This is the second Victory Patterns pattern that I’ve tried. I made the Hazel first, but still need to photograph it now that the weather has cooled down enough for long sleeves.

See all the Victory Patterns here & see the Roxanne pattern here.

Roxanne : Susanna Liberty

Roxanne : Susanna Liberty

Roxanne : Susanna Liberty

SIMPLICITY 2215 : CONSTELLATIONS

Simplicity 2215 : Constellations

Simplicity 2215
Lizzy House ‘Constellations’ fabric

This dress was made earlier this summer when Lizzy House was in town. Lizzy was here for ten glorious days teaching classes at the workroom, plus living and working at The Sewing Factory. Lizzy explains The Sewing Factory perfectly here. Basically, The Sewing Factory is a team of three comprised of Katherine, Lizzy and I. It’s what we love to do best, which is to be together and sew everything we can.

You can see all our adventures together in photos here.

You’ve seen this Simplicity pattern before in many versions. This won’t be the last, it’s just too good. I knew I needed to have a Constellations dress using this pattern since it’s my idea of a perfect dress and Constellations is my idea of a perfect fabric line. And I got to fussy cut some adorable fabric covered buttons for it! This dress is a dream. And it’s blue. I’ve made a lot of blue clothes this summer. You’re about to see them come your way as I’m photographing them slowly.

Speaking of blue. I just got some Chambray for a skirt. It will probably be made with this Simplicity pattern. To add to the 2215 collection that I’m creating. I think Chambray is the fabric of the season. I am falling in love with it for clothing projects and I love that it’s coming out in other colours besides blue. We just got some Chambray at the shop yesterday and we’ve got even more on order for the fall!

I also wanted to introduce you to Ashley! I had the pleasure of meeting Ashley in person this summer, when she visited the workroom. She was sweet enough to drop by to meet me at the shop while she passed through town, as she is all the way from California. She has been sewing up a storm of beautiful clothes that has got me inspired these days and I think you’ll love them too.

Karyn's Constellation dress in progress

Sewing Factory approved #2215

Simplicity 2215 : Constellations

Simplicity 2215 : Constellations

Simplicity 2215 : Constellations